What if the Respondent objects? - Interim FVROs

Logo for FRVO self-help guideAfter the Respondent is served with the interim FVRO, they have 21 days to object to your application.

The Respondent must send their objection to the court that made the interim FVRO. This tells the court that the Respondent does not agree with the interim FVRO becoming a final order.

The court will then contact you and arrange a final hearing where you and the Respondent will be at court together. In some courts there may be a 'mention' hearing date before the final hearing date is set.

If an objection is received, the interim FVRO continues to stay in place until it is replaced by a final FVRO or cancelled by the court.
Video: Objecting to an interim order

Requesting copies of your evidence

After they have been served with the interim FVRO, the Respondent can contact the court and ask for copies of:

  • your affidavit in support, and
  • the transcript from the first hearing.

The Respondent can ask for these things so they can see what evidence was given to the court before the interim FVRO was made. The Respondent can then decide whether or not they want to object to the interim FVRO becoming a final order.

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Disclaimer

The information displayed on this page is provided for information purposes only and does not constitute legal advice. If you have a legal problem, you should see a lawyer. Legal Aid Western Australia aims to provide information that is accurate, however does not accept responsibility for any errors or omissions in the information provided on this page or incorporated into it by reference.